Volume 8, Issue 2, June 2020, Page: 29-33
Selected Personal Factors as Predictors of Quality of Life of Cancer Patients in Southwestern Nigeria
Alice Obianiberi Ntekim, Department of Guidance and Counselling, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
Chioma Christiana Asuzu, Department of Guidance and Counselling, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
Jonathan Ohiorenuan Osiki, Department of Guidance and Counselling, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
Atara Isaiah Ntekim, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
Received: Feb. 29, 2020;       Accepted: Mar. 13, 2020;       Published: Mar. 31, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.jctr.20200802.11      View  454      Downloads  137
Abstract
The incidence of cancer across the globe has shown that the disease is a leading cause of death worldwide; and it accounted for 7.6 million deaths, which is about 13% of all deaths in 2018. Also, deaths from cancer worldwide are projected to be rising, with an estimated 12 million deaths in 2030. In spite of the efforts of stakeholders to control the prevalence and incidence of cancer, there still increase in reported cases of cancer incidence in Nigeria. Previous studies mainly focused on psychological and social variables as they affect cancer and cancer patients; while little concentration was made on personal factors of age, gender, marital and employment status in relation to quality of life of cancer patients, particularly in Nigeria. This study, therefore, examined personal factors as predictors of quality of life of cancer patients in Southwestern Nigeria. The study adopted descriptive survey design of correlational type. The population for this study consisted of all the diagnosed cancer patients who are attending clinics in the South West of Nigeria. Purposive sampling technique was employed to select 312 patients who were willing and able to participate in the study. A validated questionnaire was used for data collection; which yielded a reliability value of 0.88. Data were analyzed using frequency counts and percentages for demographic characteristics, while multiple linear regression was used to test the hypotheses at 0.05 alpha level. There was a significant joint prediction of personal factors on quality of life of cancer patients in Southwestern Nigeria (F(4,307)=101.078; p<0.05). Age (β=0.275, p>0.05), gender (β=0.537, p>0.05), employment status (β=0.236, p>0.05) and marital status (β=0.242, p>0.05) independently had no significant prediction on quality of life of cancer patients in Southwestern Nigeria. There was a significant joint prediction of personal factors on quality of life of cancer patients in Southwestern Nigeria. It was also concluded that age, gender, employment and marital status independently had no significant prediction on quality of life of cancer patients in the study area.
Keywords
Personal Factors, Quality of Life, Cancer Patients
To cite this article
Alice Obianiberi Ntekim, Chioma Christiana Asuzu, Jonathan Ohiorenuan Osiki, Atara Isaiah Ntekim, Selected Personal Factors as Predictors of Quality of Life of Cancer Patients in Southwestern Nigeria, Journal of Cancer Treatment and Research. Vol. 8, No. 2, 2020, pp. 29-33. doi: 10.11648/j.jctr.20200802.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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